National Sections of the L5I:

National Liberation

Ireland: Britain's treacherous peace

JOHN MAJOR failed to end the Irish war but he did begin the most serious peace offensive by the British state for many years. Read more...

Congress and the birth of India

14 August marks the fiftieth anniversary of India’s independence. Richard Brenner examines how the British Raj met its end, not through some enlightened decision to “give India self-government” but through the actions of the mass movement against foreign rule, led by the Indian National Congress and its foremost representatives, Mahatma Ghandi and Jawaharlal Nehru. Read more...

Britain: Separation for Scotland and Wales?

Elected on a wave of unprecedented popular enthusiasm, Tony Blair’s New Labour government has lost little time in shelving most of its promises of democratic and constitutional reform.

On the firm recommendation of the party’s “spin doctors”, Peter Mandelson and Alistair Campbell, plans for a Freedom of Information Act to open up the workings of one of the most secretive states of the Western democracies to greater public scrutiny have been swiftly dropped. Another measure making no appearance in the government’s legislative timetable is the plan to abolish the voting rights of hereditary peers in the House of Lords, Britain’s unelected second chamber. Read more...

Rethinking the road to power in Ireland

Maureen Harrington reviews the new programme of Socialist Democracy\Ireland: The Promise of Socialism is by written by three members of Socialist Democracy – the Irish section of the United Secretariat of the Fourth International (USFI). Read more...

Russian Troops Out! Self-determination for Chechnya!

In March the LRCI and the Trotskyist Faction agreed a joint declaration on the Russian occupation of Chechnya. This statement is part of the process of regroupment discussions set out by both tendencies in December 1995 Read more...

The genesis of Irish nationalism - The United Irishmen and the failed revolution of 1798

In 1795 the United Irishmen, the first Irish republicans, refounded themselves as an underground revolutionary organisation. In September of the same year, the Orange Society was established as a mass reactionary alliance of landlords and loyalist peasantry. The aim of the United Irishmen was to recreate the French Revolution in Ireland; the Orangemen's goal was to prevent it. So the "two traditions" referred to in the Downing Street Declaration both have something to commemorate this year. Read more...

Forging the nation? The failure of third world nationalism

Dave Stockton continues a series on Marxism and the National Question with a survey of the development and fragmentation of national consciousness under the impact of colonialism. Read more...

Capitalism and nationalism in the “Third World”

After the 1982 debt crisis the IMF wielded a big stick over the semi-colonial countries. At the same time it dangled a very small carrot a considerable distance ahead of them. To make themselves credit worthy once again and attractive to foreign investors they would have to slash state budgets, strive for a balance of payments equilibrium and exchange rate stability. They would have to abandon all attempts at import substitution and orient their production to maximise export earnings. Finally they were obliged to auction their state assets to the highest bidder. For the big banks the purpose of this programme was clear. Read more...