National Sections of the L5I:

Liberation

Irish republicanism at an impasse

It is twenty five years since the civil rights revolt gave birth to the modern IRA. Here, Matt Docherty assesses republicanism’s strategy for a united Ireland today in the light of the recent historic changes in world politics. Read more...

War and Peace in Bosnia. No imperialist solutions!

Dave Stockton assesses the west’s options after the Bosnian Serbs’ rejection of the Vance-Owen plan Read more...

“Neither Washington nor Moscow” The view from the third camp

Conflicts between imperialism and petit bourgeois nationalist and Stalinist-led forces in the semi-colonial world have raged throughout the post-war era. From Korea in the 1950s through to Afghanistan in the 1980s revolutionaries had to declare which side they were on. Here, Dave Hughes asks this question of the SWP and its forerunners. Read more...

SWP and women’s liberation - Economism versus feminism?

Over the past few years the SWP leaders have been arguing over whether working class men benefit from women’s oppression. The answer seems fairly straight forward. Yes. They have higher wages than women, are more unionised, have more valued skills, they don’t have to do much housework, and don’t face problems of sexual harassment and assault. Read more...

Romper Stomper

Colin Lloyd reviews Romper Stomper Read more...

Malcolm X, by Spike Lee

Margaret McNair reviews Malcolm X by Spike Lee Read more...

A betrayal in the making; South Africa’s false new dawn

In January F W de Klerk opened the “last apartheid parliament” and negotiations with the ANC on power-sharing entered their decisive phase. Lesley Day assesses the chances of making the settlement stick.

On 2 February 1990 F W de Klerk announced the end of the National Party’s defence of apartheid. Read more...

Can apartheid be destroyed by reforms?

The LRCI immediately recognised the real threat posed to the liberation struggle by the negotiation process. We argued that the ANC leadership would:

“. . . direct the whole mass movement into a strategic compromise—a multi-racial imperialist capitalism based on the super-exploitation of the black and coloured masses, and perhaps even a small section of poor whites.”1

Our previous analysis of the development and crisis of South African imperialism2 meant that we were not deceived by the pseudo-radical theory that apartheid and capitalism formed an indissoluble whole. Read more...