National Sections of the L5I:

Fascism

Film and Freedom

Ken Loach has made many memorable films, most recently My Name is Joe. An earlier Loach film, Land and Freedom, dealt with the Spanish Civil war of the late 1930s. As in all his films Loach's loyalty to the working class and its struggles is evident. The interview, by Alejandra Rîos, was for Estrategia Internacional No. 10, the journal of the Argentinian group, the PTS. This version has been abridged for reasons of space. Thanks are due to all concerned in the interview and its translation. Read more...

Hitler 1889-1936: hubris

It is a fair bet that Hitler would be on most people’s top ten list of twentieth century figures who were “mad, bad and dangerous to know”. Kershaw’s excellent first volume of Hitler’s life tells us why they’d be right. Read more...

British fascism: Routed on the streets

Sir Oswald Mosley, MP, split from Labour to form the New Party in March 1931, together with a group of left MPs. By October 1932 Mosley had transformed the party into the British Union of Fascists. Paul Morris recounts the events that led to his movement’s defeat. Read more...

Fascism: yesterday and today...

The rise of fascist front parties across Europe is a symptom of a deepening social crisis. How do these parties relate to “classic” pre-war fascism? How do they differ from established conservative parties? Clare Heath argues that the right answer to these questions is crucial to smashing the renewed threat of fascism. Read more...

France: The FN: twists and turns of a fascist front

The French Front National (FN) was founded in 1972 as a coalition of fascist tendencies. It grouped together Vichy collaborators, young thugs and a handful of non-party fascists, like Jean-Marie Le Pen, who had played minor roles in the post-war history of the French far-right. By 1980 the FN had only 270 members, of whom scarcely 100 were fully paid-up.1 Three years later the FN won 2.2 million votes in the European elections and Le Pen’s face was on the front page of every newspaper. Over the next 10 years, the FN was able to put down deep roots and is now a fundamental feature of the political landscape. Its impact on every other political party has been enormous. Read more...

The MSI: “The cudgel and the double breasted suit”

Italy is the only western European state in which a fascist party has joined a government since 1945.1 The entry of the Movimento Sociale Italiano (MSI) into the coalition government of Silvio Berlusconi prompted alarm amongst the left in Italy and around the world. It also provoked some revealing reactions from the bosses’ press. The Economist reassured its readers:

“Hitler and Stalin were monsters. Mussolini by comparison was a farmyard rooster . . . the true mark of fascism, belief in a peculiar variety of one-party corporate state—not, it should be said, a belief shared by this newspaper—is not Nazism or racism. Let the word ‘fascist’ be reserved for those who profess that belief, and today’s neo-fascists be judged for their own ideas, not Hitler’s.”2 Read more...

Russia’s rising fascist threat

Kate Foster reports on the rise of fascism in Russia Read more...

The resistable rise of Le Pen

Fascism is on the rise in Europe, and the workers’ movement and the left is responding with useless pacifism and complacency. The LRCI’s section in France has taken up the fight. In an article edited from this month’s edition of Pouvoir Ouvrier, Emile Gallet explains the background to the rise of Le Pen’s Front National. We also reprint (right) the Pouvoir Ouvrier leaflet to the abortive anti-Le Pen demo on 1 May. Read more...