National Sections of the L5I:

Fascism

Dramatic gains for Austrian far right are a danger for the working class

The death of Jorg Haider, the leader of the Alliance for the Future of Austria, was no loss to humanity. Indeed, many will be pleased to see the end of this right wing demagogue who celebrated the memory of the Waffen SS and praised the "employment policies" of the Third Reich. However, his passing may prove to be a benefit to the extreme right in Austria. Read more...

Parole opportunity for Màrio

Màrio Bango, a young Roma imprisoned since 2001 for defending his brother against a racist attack, will be able to apply for early release in October of this year. As he says in his latest letter from Ilava, the hardest prison in Slovakia: “I think I have a great chance because they forgave me two years and this is a lot. But we must do everything we can to take this chance – it really will be a great success if I can be free. I can’t imagine it. Really freedom – incredible!!!” Read more...

1922: Mussolinis march on Rome

Fascism came to power in Italy at the point when the real revolutionary period in Italy between 1920 and 1922 (the “biennio rosso”) had begun to wane. Under the centrist leadership of Antonio Gramsci and Amedeo Bordiga, Italian workers had not forged an alliance with the peasants and land workers and were unable to take the post-war factory occupations and control of production beyond the point of dual power. Read more...

Australia: race riots rock Sydney suburbs

It should come as no surprise to anyone that there have been several nights of violence on along the eastern beaches train line of suburban Sydney. Read more...

Film and Freedom

Ken Loach has made many memorable films, most recently My Name is Joe. An earlier Loach film, Land and Freedom, dealt with the Spanish Civil war of the late 1930s. As in all his films Loach's loyalty to the working class and its struggles is evident. The interview, by Alejandra Rîos, was for Estrategia Internacional No. 10, the journal of the Argentinian group, the PTS. This version has been abridged for reasons of space. Thanks are due to all concerned in the interview and its translation. Read more...

Hitler 1889-1936: hubris

It is a fair bet that Hitler would be on most people’s top ten list of twentieth century figures who were “mad, bad and dangerous to know”. Kershaw’s excellent first volume of Hitler’s life tells us why they’d be right. Read more...

British fascism: Routed on the streets

Sir Oswald Mosley, MP, split from Labour to form the New Party in March 1931, together with a group of left MPs. By October 1932 Mosley had transformed the party into the British Union of Fascists. Paul Morris recounts the events that led to his movement’s defeat. Read more...

Fascism: yesterday and today...

The rise of fascist front parties across Europe is a symptom of a deepening social crisis. How do these parties relate to “classic” pre-war fascism? How do they differ from established conservative parties? Clare Heath argues that the right answer to these questions is crucial to smashing the renewed threat of fascism. Read more...