National Sections of the L5I:

Issues

China: “socialism” with capitalist characteristics

On present trends China could be the biggest economy in the world by the year 2010. But will it be capitalist? Peter Main explores the contradictory dynamic of the present phase of economic development. Read more...

“Neither Washington nor Moscow” The view from the third camp

Conflicts between imperialism and petit bourgeois nationalist and Stalinist-led forces in the semi-colonial world have raged throughout the post-war era. From Korea in the 1950s through to Afghanistan in the 1980s revolutionaries had to declare which side they were on. Here, Dave Hughes asks this question of the SWP and its forerunners. Read more...

Bosnia - which side are you on?

The SWP has consistently refused to support the right of multi-ethnic Bosnia to defend itself against ethnic cleansing. This article, from 1993, debunks Socialist Worker’s lame excuses. Read more...

SWP and the unions: Syndicalism’s fear of the bureaucracy

It might at first sight seem curious to accuse the Socialist Workers Party of syndicalism. After all is it not a party? But Colin Lloyd argues that in fact the SWP has a thoroughly syndicalist notion of the rank and file movement and the struggle for union democracy. Read more...

Maastricht and beyond: a capitalist United States of Europe?

1992 came and went. But did European unity go with it? Keith Harvey examines the prospects. Read more...

The 1953 split in the Fourth International

Forty years ago, the Fourth International (FI) was rent by a substantial political debate over perspectives and orientation. A number of important sections (Britain, France, USA) set up the "International Committee of the Fourth International" in November 1953, in opposition to the majority "International Secretariat".

The split still reverberates today. Some of the international organisations which call themselves Trotskyist can claim to be the direct descendants of one or the other side, and virtually all of them have a clear view on the split. The split has become part of the mythology of Trotskyism, presented as a principled defence of "orthodox Trotskyism" against a political deviation led by one man ("Pablo") or as a damaging split which led to the subsequent and lasting weakness of the International. Read more...

The battle of Stalingrad

The decisive battle of World War Two was fought at Stalingrad. The Red Army stopped Hitler’s drive to conquer the USSR and began the march west which was to destroy Nazism. Despite the terrible suffering and cost in human lives, and despite the degeneration of the workers’ state under Stalin’s rule, the USSR’s war with German imperialism was a just war. It was a war to defend the remaining gains of the Russian Revolution against fascism’s determination to destroy them. But the Stalinist bureaucracy came within an inch of losing that war. Then, the military turning point signalled the start of a process that was to see the consolidation of Stalinist rule in Eastern Europe. Paul Morris explains the class issues at stake in the defence of the USSR during World War Two. Read more...

Capitalist restoration: stalled at the crossroads

Since 1990, the capitalists have seemed to be winning hands down in Eastern Europe. However, as Martin Suchanek explains, their plans to introduce workers to the wonders of capitalist exploitation are running into trouble.

For the last two years those bourgeois commentators keen to monitor the progress of capitalist restoration in Eastern Europe have focused on three countries: Hungary, Czechoslovakia and Poland. As compared to the Balkans or even the disintegrating USSR, they were expected to blaze a trail for others to follow. Each of the three possessed advantages over other countries in the region. Read more...