National Sections of the L5I:

Rough Guide to the Anticapitalist Movement

Statement by the father of Carlo Giuliani

Press reports initially described Carlo as “homeless and unemployed, with a criminal background.” Carlo’s father is an official of the CGIL, the large, Communist affiliated trade union federation. Read more...

After the battle of Genoa

The anti-G8 protest in Genoa was the biggest summit protest yet. Between 150,000-200,000 participated on the final day (J21). This included large numbers of trade unionists from all the major Italian union confederations and masses of supporters of Rifondazione Comunista. It was also the most violent yet – with the police, carabinieri and anti-terrorist squads conducting a campaign of terror not seen since the days of Mussolini. Unarmed protester Carlo Giuliani was shot dead. Mass, peaceful marches were deliberately attacked with batons and teargas. During the post-demonstration “sweep” by police, systematic use of extreme violence and even torture took place. Read more...

ATTAC

The French acronym ATTAC stands for “Association for the Taxation of Financial Transactions to Aid Citizens” It was launched in June 1998 on the initiative of Ignacio Ramonet, the editor of Le Monde Diplomatique and Bernard Cassen, its director. Read more...

World Social Forum

The World Social Forum owes its origins to the counter-conferences initiated by ATTAC held in Switzerland as an alternative. to the World Economic Forum whilst it was meeting in the millionaires’ ski-resort of Davos. Two Brazilians, Oded Grajew and Chico Whitaker, who attended the anti-Davos in January 2000 had the original idea of holding a world social forum. Read more...

Porto Alegre Principles

The World Social Forum Charter of Principles is a document clearly written by the intellectuals of the movement for representatives of reformist parties and capitalist funded NGOs. It asserts the right “to guide the continued pursuit of that initiative” and demands “to be respected by all those who wish to take part in the process”. Read more...

Argentina 2002

“Through the movement’s emails, websites, face to face gatherings, stories emerged of a land where polticians were so discredited that they were ridiculed wherever they went, angry middle-class women smashed up banks, occupied factories were run by the workers, ordinary people held meetings to decide how to run their factories, and thousands of unemployed people blocked highways, demanding food and jobs. It sounded like France 1968, or Spain during the civil war, yet it was lasting for months across a country 11 times the size of the UK, in a state that until recently was one of the world’s top 20 strongest economies ... It was happening in Argentina ...the noise of hundreds of thousands of voices calling for a new world as the government fled from office and people took control of their everyday lives... inspiring activists from as afar afield as South Africa, Italy, Thailand and Belgium to visit...to witness the reinvention of politics from the bottom up.”
[John Jordan, UK anticapitalist actvist in the Guardian, 25 January 2003] Read more...

Hugo Chávez

At the January 2003 World Social Forum in Porto Alegre, Lula’s attendance as Brazil’s new President was a hurried affair, a stop-over on his way to Davos to attend the bosses World Economic Forum. The real star was the man Lula invited to Brazil. Read more...

Lula’s fall from grace

The global justice movement has fallen out of love with Lula. Only the right-wing of the World Social Forum still revere him; many are disillusioned by his record as Brazil’s president and a growing number in his own country revile him. Whereas he was man of the moment when he was lauded at the second WSF in Brazil in 2003, just after he won the presidential election, now many in the anti-capitalist movement identify with those in the trade unions and the impatient landless peasants’ movement, the MST – in their fight against Lula’s government. Read more...

Brazil’s participatory budgets

In his first public statement after winning the October 2002 election, Lula pointed to the example of PT governments in various states and cities to point out that fiscal responsibility and “creativity in the social area” can go hand in hand to meet the expectations and aspirations of “all Brazilian civil society”. Read more...

Charities against capital

Non-Governmental Organisations, NGOs, have played an important but highly contradictory role in the anti-capitalist movement. They have often been to the fore in opposing the G8 and IMF policies for the Third World and have been crucial in alerting the world to the consequences of those policies. At the same time, as we shall see, they have themselves flourished as a result of those policies and have developed into the most systematically right wing trend in the movement. Read more...

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