National Sections of the L5I:

Rough Guide to the Anticapitalist Movement

The spectre of a Fifth International

Among the issues being debated by the theorists and publicists of the movement is the formation of a Fifth International.

One of the key figures on the reformist wing of the movement, Bernard Cassen of Attac and the World Social Forum, declares himself firmly opposed to what he calls the “nagging temptation of the fifth international”. Read more...

The First International

The International Working Men’s Association (IWMA), later to be known as the First International, was founded on 28 September 1864 at St Martin’s Hall in London. Despite the fact that it only existed for 12 years, it had an enormous influence on the world working class and anticapitalist movement. It was the first organisation which consciously set out to organise the working class into a worldwide force struggling against capitalism for its own emancipation. Read more...

The Second International

The Second International was founded in Paris in 1889 and it ended the national isolation of socialist organisations after the collapse of the First International. By this time, powerful socialist parties had been created in many European countries, often on the basis of the programmatic documents of the IWMA. Read more...

The Third International

The Third International, also known as the Communist International, was born out of the revolutionary opposition to the first World War. Small and isolated at first, this opposition held its first conference in Zimmerwald, Switzerland, in September 1915. The Zimmerwald movement rallied increasing support as the horror of the war hit home. Read more...

The Fourth International

When the German bosses brought Hitler to power in order to crush the German Communist and Social Democratic parties and trade unions, not one section of the Communist International questioned the disastrous policy of the Comintern’s leadership. Trotsky and his followers in the International Left Opposition declared the Comintern dead for the purpose for which it had been founded, leading the working class to revolution. Just as Lenin and the Bolsheviks recognised the need to form a new International after the Second broke its fundamental pledge to resist imperialist war, now Trotsky and his small band of supporters saw the need to assemble the forces for a new revolutionary International. Read more...

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