National Sections of the L5I:

History

Indigenism in Latin America

Five hundred years age two continents collided. Europe and Latin America clashed in an unequal contest. Subjugation and exploitation followed, its chief victim the indigenous people. Diego Mocar surveys the resurgence of indigenous movements as they mark five centuries of resistance. Read more...

'Tyrants, believe and tremble' - the Chartist movement in Britain

The example of Chartism proves there is a revolutionary tradition in the British working class writes Stuart King Read more...

Independent Labour Party: Lessons of the split pt2

In the last article (http://www.fifthinternational/node/1495) we examined the development of the Independent Labour Party up to Labour’s electoral disaster in 1931. The Independent Labour Party was down to five MPs who were not endorsed by the Labour Party because of their refusal to abide by the Parliamentary Labour Party’s discipline. In this second part of the article John McKee and Keith Lawry look at the problems of the ILP’s split with the Labour Party and its subsequent political evolution Read more...

Independent Labour Party: Lessons of the split pt1

The Labour party has not been the only mass working class party in the history of the British Labour movement. But what are the lessons of the shortlived Independent Labour Party? Read more...

The retreat from Labourism

Tradition can be a valuable asset for the working class. It can embody noble principles of solidarity and struggle, carried from generation to generation and nurtured by the class’ fighting organisations. Revolutionaries seek to transform such tradition into the collective memory of the working class, so that it can learn from past victories and defeats. Yet tradition can also be a dead weight, a substitute for clear thought, an exercise in romantic consolation for those who cannot or will not fight today’s battles, and a means of concealing the reality of the past from the new generation. Read more...

Poland’s transition to capitalism

Jan Bielecki is Poland’s Prime Minister. Ten years ago he was a Solidarnosc member in Gdansk, delivering lumber for his living. Under martial law he was an underground activist, assisting the Gdansk shipyard to keep its printing press going. In January 1991 Bielecki was chosen by President Lech Walesa to oversee the country’s transition to capitalism. Another 13 of Bielecki’s cabinet have Solidarnosc membership going back to 1980 when the ten million strong mass movement pitched itself into a battle against the Stalinist dictatorship.1 Read more...

How capitalism triumphed in East Germany

Adopted by the International Executive Committee, 30 July 1990

The German Democratic Republic (GDR) was formed as part of the defensive reaction by the USSR to Marshall Aid. The latter was used by imperialism in an attempt to resuscitate capitalist forces in Eastern Europe. Read more...

Leon Trotsky - Revolutionary fighter

August 20th 1940 is the day that Ramón Mercader, a Stalinist agent, struck the death blow that killed Leon Trotsky, the Russian revolutionary and founder of the Fourth International. This article, originally to commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of his death, is written by Dave Stockton Read more...

The death agony of Stalinism: The Crisis of the USSR and the Degenerate Workers’ States

Resolution adopted by the International Executive Committee of the LRCI, 4 March 1990

During 1989 a series of mass popular revolutions swept through Eastern Europe. The power of the Stalinist bureaucratic dictatorships was weakened or destroyed. In the first half of the year, the Chinese bureaucracy was momentarily paralysed by a mass student movement which began to draw in sections of the proletariat. The bureaucracy was only able to halt the developing revolutionary crisis by severe repression. Read more...

How the French Communist Party betrayed the 1948 miners’ strike

We reprint here a 1949 article from Quatrième Internationale, the French language journal of the Fourth International (FI) on the 1948 French miners’ strike. During the strike the miners were subjected to murderous repression organised by Jules Moch, the Socialist Party Minister of the Interior. But responsibility for the strike’s defeat lay with the French Communist Party (PCF) led trade union, the Confédération Générale du Travail (CGT), which consistently refused to spread the action throughout the French working class. Read more...