National Sections of the L5I:

Fifth International volume 2 issue 3

Pakistan: on the verge of revolution

Luke Cooper surveys the background to Pakistan's crisis and outlines the growing isolation of the military regime, the mounting movement of marches, strikes and armed clashes against the dictatorship, and the way forward for the working class and the poor. Read more...

International Marxist Tendency in Pakistan

In his article, written on the movement at the end of March, Alan Woods, the IMT’s main international leader and theorist, outlined their perspective. He argued that the movement could have been turned into a revolutionary struggle against the regime, but lacked the leadership and this is to be expected given the lawyers are part of the middle class intelligentsia. He continued by criticising the opposition parties for their call for Musharraf to resign or face being thrown out of power, arguing that ‘these were just words’ and because of this ‘the movement would end up in a dead end.’37 Read more...

Pakistan: the programme of permanent revolution

The working class and the rural and urban masses must now be won to the struggle for power – to end the rule of capital and establish a working class state that gives land to the peasants. As the Russian Revolutionary Leon Trotsky argued in 1917 the revolution must be “made permanent” – i.e. it must continue from the national democratic struggle to the struggle for working class power and world socialist revolution. Read more...

A step towards revolutionary unity

The first political party to be founded in the British colony of Ceylon, in 1935, was a workers’ party, the Lanka Sama Samaja Party or Ceylon Equal Society Party (LSSP). The first Communist (Stalinist) Party on the island originated from a minority split in the LSSP in 1940. During the Second World War the LSSP itself split with a section of it – the Bolshevik Samasamaja Party – rallying to the Fourth International. Re-unification of the BSP and the LSSP in 1950 saw the latter become a section of the Fourth International. Read more...

Sri Lanka: from civil war to permanent revolution

The ongoing offensive by the Sri Lankan army against the bases of the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE), commonly known as the Tamil Tigers, indicates the determination of the present government to isolate and militarily defeat them. Read more...

Whatever happened to the anticapitalist movement?

“After the disappointment that was Nairobi, many long-standing participants in the [World Social] Forum are asking themselves: Is the WSF still the most appropriate vehicle for the new stage in the struggle of the global justice and peace movement? Or, having fulfilled its historic function of aggregating and linking the diverse counter-movements spawned by global capitalism, is it time for the WSF to fold up its tent and give way to new modes of global organisation of resistance and transformation?” The Forum at the Crossroads, Walden Bello, May 4, 2007 Read more...

The postmodernist sickness in the anticapitalist movement

Probably the most sophisticated expression of the postmodern theory that has been used to support the idea that the World Social Forum should not organise struggles and should remain merely a space is that of Boaventura de Sousa Santos, Professor of Sociology at the School of Economics, University of Coimbra in Portugal. Read more...

The resistible rise of German imperialism

The Grand Coalition government of Chancellor Angela Merkel continues to press forward to the formation of a European imperialist bloc under the leadership of Germany and France. Here Martin Suchanek looks at the threat of a resurgent imperialist power Read more...

100 years on: the relevance of permanent revolution

Luke Cooper reviews 100 Years of Permanent Revolution: Results and Prospects, edited by Bill Dunn and Hugo Radice, published by Pluto Press, 2006 Read more...

Rebuilding the Latin American left

Andy York reviews Rebuilding the Left by Marta Harnecker, Zed Books, 2007 Read more...